Adherence Management (AdM)

Behavior (i.e. adherence) is what a person does!

It is not what he/she thinks, feels, or believes.   These are the words of the poet Emily Dickinson more than a century before B.F. Skinner began his study of human behavior.   As clinicians, one of our goals is to change people's behavior. They have a lifetime of habits. Those habits have contributed to their illness.   We often believe that patients will readily accept the plan of care we have outlined for them and yet the research is clear.  At least half of those patients will fail to do so, for one reason or another.  

Whether you are a nurse educator, speech therapist, physical therapist, dietitian, pharmacist, or other health services professional,  BEARS can help you make a difference for the 50% who are at risk.   Our job is not to create nurses, advocates, or therapists.   Our job is to provide you with the evidence-based tools that will allow you to bring out the best in your patients.

An Applied Behavioral Approach to Your Patient's Training Program

WE TEACH YOU HOW TO TAKE OVER AT THE POINT THAT MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING CONCLUDES

For more than thirty years, Motivational Interviewing (MI) has been the method of choice for changing patient behavior related to adherence/compliance in following their provider's plan of care. Adherence Management (AdM) Coaching continues to work with patients after their discharge and uses applied behavioral training to improve outcomes. Each year more than 125,000 people die because they did not develop the habits necessary to follow their personalized plan of care. AdM Coaching augments MI in order to improve the outcome of adherence thereby reducing unnecessary hospital readmissions.

Whether you are a nurse educator, speech therapist, physical therapist, dietitian, pharmacist, or other health services professional,  BEARS can help you make a difference for the 50% who are at risk.   Our job is not to create nurses, advocates, or therapists.   Our job is to provide you with the evidence-based tools that will allow you to bring out the best in your patients.

"Am I Better, Now?"

This is perhaps the most frequent question patients ask. "Am I better, doc?" Try answering their question by asking another. "Are you following your plan of care?" Chances are, if the patient says no, then, they are not doing better. For most of us, our lives are on autopilot. We develop habits over our lifetime and then one day something doesn't go as planned. Outside intervention in the form of a medication and/or new habits need to be developed. Clearly, there needs to be some exchange of information. Patients have to be "perfectly taught." The reality is, for at least 50% of our patient population, the information tends to go in one ear and out the other, resulting in a state of ambivalence and over time, is forgotten.

To read the complete two-page document comparing MI to AdM, CLICK HERE